About This Blog

When I was 9 years old, a friend bought me a Hardy Boys book (The Bombay Boomerang) since he knew I liked to read.  I had never heard of this series, but I liked the book and started buying the rest of that original series of 58 books.

I thought it was cool that I was 9 and the books were for the “10-to-14” set…

As an adult I began to wonder how those old books would hold up to my mature taste.  On my iPad I bought a few Hardy Boy ebooks, and what I found surprised me: I liked them!

Oh sure, they are obviously written for the juvenile mind, and when you read it as an adult you can’t help but see those limitations.  Good literature this ain’t.

Yet just as we love Scooby Doo because every cartoon is exactly like every other one, there is something very comforting about Frank and Joe forever enjoying summer before their Senior year of High School, of Bayport being familiar, of Chet forever having a new hobby (that gets used in the mystery), and Aunt Gertrude making heaping sandwiches and thick wedges of pie for her hungry nephews.

I may use some humor and a bit of snark in my reviews, but I assure you I approach these reviews with affection and respect.

And while I’m happy to hear from folks, I set this blog up as a resource for the reader.  It consists of this page, the Resources page,  along with the 58 individual reviews, one or two extra posts and that’s it.  When I reviewed book 58, I was done.  I will leave this site up as a future resource.  Want to comment on anything you read here?  Simply email me at my gmail address: It’s simply my full name (first and last concatenated), and that’s it.

Please use the Search functionality to find what you are looking for.  Want to find every book that includes Sam Radley?  Search for his name.  Want to find the book where Aunt Gertrude made a cherry pie?  Search for “cherry pie” and you’ll have it.

To show how widespread the popularity of these books is, I get readers to this site from over 100 different countries on every continent on Earth:

Screen Shot 2014-09-21 at 11.29.12 AM

Truly the Hardy Boys are a worldwide phenomenon. Welcome, all of you!

Here are the 10 books that were most popular during 2016:

1. The Tower Treasure

11. While the Clock Ticked

3. The Secret of the Old Mill

5. Hunting for Hidden Gold

10. What Happened at Midnight

6. The Shore Road Mystery

2. The House on the Cliff

58. The Sting of the Scorpion

27. The Secret of Skull Mountain

45. The Mystery of the Spiral Bridge

Hardy Boys books and covers are all copyright Grosset & Dunlap and the Penguin Group.  Please buy copies of these marvelous books.

Oh, and if you want to buy a copy of my book, here ya go: (and if you are on a mobile device that is not showing the icon, here is the link to my $0.99 ebook)

Cover

Thanks for reading!

Nicolas Akmakjian

9 thoughts on “About This Blog”

  1. Hi Nicholas. Great blog and some really good information. I too read the books when I was young and read all the blue spine books eventually and most of them more than once.
    I just finished reading The Ghost At Skeleton Rock and it was a good mystery. James Lawrence is one of my favourite HB writers (along with Andrew Swenson and James Buechler).
    I have a question about the book. the original was written in 1957 and the rewrite only 8 years later in 1966. Any reason why the book was rewritten so quickly? Did it have anything to do with what happened in Cuba in the late 50’s and they had to alter some of the story.

    1. Hi JT,

      Thanks so much for reading and commenting. Why did Skeleton Rock get revised so quickly? I think primarily it got caught up in the process when so many other books were being revised. They got to this one, figured let’s do it too, noting your Cuba issue, and be consistent with all our books. That’s my guess.

      Nicolas Akmakjian

  2. Hi there. Just wanted to leave a note of appreciation for this blog. I too was a Hardy Boys fan as a kid, and now I’m reading the books to my five year-old son, who loves them. He’s a particular fan of Chet, to the point of requesting a birthday cake depicting that beloved gourmand:

    Anyway, it’s great to have them all broken down this way, so thanks again.

    Caelum

  3. I just read my first Hardy Boys book! I’m an elementary school librarian, I really should have read them before now. However, I read this one because I had a student with a question. He read #23 The Melted Coins c.1944, which was about a Spanish man with amnesia, counterfeiting stolen coins, and a curse of the Caribbees or Carabaya. The quiz was about something called Spoonmouth, and Zoar college. Totally different plots. But, when I search for answers, #23 comes up with only one title, The Melted Coins, and, depending on the site, different annotations of the story. Can you shed any light on this mystery?

    1. The mystery is solved! The c.1944 edition was the original version, but this blog reviewed the second version from 1970. That version had a new plot.

      You will find that to be true of most of the original 58 Hardy Boys: They were originally written from the 1920s through the 1950s, but then in the 1950s, 60s and 70s they were rewritten. In some cases the plots stayed more or less the same, but in others it’s an entirely different story. The Flickering Torch Mystery (#22) is famously completely different from edition to edition.

      Wikipedia often describes both plots, as it does in the case of The Melted Coins: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Melted_Coins

  4. Thank you! Now we know! The student and I will have a new challenge: read the originals and then read the rewrites. Maybe ponder on WHY they were re-written. Thank you for solving this mystery for us, Frank and Joe would be proud 🙂

  5. I’m really enjoying your website. I read all of the Hardy Boys books when I was a kid, and your reviews are bringing back positive memories. My husband and I are planning on moving soon, and I’m sorting through a lot of old books, including my HB mysteries, to decide what to keep and what to donate to our local library’s book drive. I have a small frozen dessert business called Huge Hound, and I wrote a blog post for my business website about Biff Hooper’s huge bloodhound Sherlock—and his near-fatal encounter with poisoned ice cream—in Danger on Vampire Trail:
    http://www.hugehound.com/blog/2017/3/4/a-huge-hound-in-the-hardy-boys

    1. Thank you for writing. I created this site for people such as yourself who enjoyed the books a kids and have fond memories of them.

      Great idea to tie in Sherlock’s experience to your business!

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An adult looks back at his childhood treasure of books and sees how they hold up today.

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